The Art of Communication

Institute of Communication Studies, University of Punjab Collaborates with Mishal Pakistan to Develop Media Credibility Index

Posted by on 18 Jul, 2013

Institute of Communication Studies (ICS), University of Punjab Collaborates with Mishal Pakistan to develop Media Credibility Index, an initiative to create new frameworks and methodologies to measure current trends and indices on media ethics, journalism standards, media credibility and rankings to be measured on international benchmarks.

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PreCall – 4th intl. conference on M4D – Dakar, Senegal – 8-9 April 2014

Posted by on 19 Mar, 2013

This conference is the fourth in the M4D biennial series following the inaugural conference in Karlstad, Sweden in 2008. The 2nd conference was in Kampala, Uganda in 2010 and the...

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Posted by on 11 Aug, 2014

With a median age of 22, 63% of youth is under the age of 29 years, making Pakistan as one of the youngest nations in the world – Puruesh Chaudhary, President Agahi   ...

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Interview: Aliya Nazki


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Fluent in English, Urdu and Hindi, news anchor Aliya Nazki’s presentation style in the BBC Urdu programme, Sairbeen, won her the prestigious AGAHI Award 2013 for Emerging Current Affairs Anchor of the Year. After a short break off air, the programme – hosted by Nazki along with seasoned broadcaster, Shafi Naqi Jamie – is now re-launching in a new format, available online and to be broadcast on Aaj Tv. Newsline speaks to the Srinagar-born anchor about her life and work.

Tell us about Sairbeen. How did you get involved with it? 

Sairbeen is BBC Urdu’s flagship Tv show which draws on the BBC’s unparalleled international news-gathering presence. It brings regional reporting from BBC Urdu correspondents in Washington, Delhi and across Pakistan, and also analysis from BBC Urdu’s leading journalists. Our show offers a different and more global perspective to news and important contemporary issues. Arts, technology, travel and social media are also within the programme’s ambit.

Before joining the team which launched Sairbeen in February 2013, I worked for our website (bbcurdu.com) as an interactive video producer. I was approached as a possible programme host. I loved the pilots, being on air, knowing that I am speaking directly with audiences across Pakistan – and also with those who watch it wherever they are in the world, online. I accepted the opportunity to try myself on this platform.

Personally speaking, how was the switch from radio to television?

The two mediums are vastly different and that necessarily reflects in the treatment of the stories. Doing Tv programmes is also a more intense and stressful process. Purely because there are so many more things that can go wrong, and you have to make sure that you deliver 110 per cent every single time. Having said that, I have to say I enjoy Tv more. It’s more intense, but that’s what makes it more exciting.

Once upon a time, BBC radio was what everyone tuned in to for honest reporting. The news scenario in Pakistan has changed now, with so many news channels beaming live. What gives you an edge?

Honest, unbiased, objective reporting continues to be BBC Urdu’s distinctive feature – it doesn’t really matter which platform we are on, be it radio, online, mobiles or Tv. On trust, the BBC ranks highest among international broadcasters in Pakistan. The “edge” we have in the Pakistani media market is ensured by the BBC’s editorial approach to any story.

Additionally, what also makes our news special is the extensive spread of our newsgathering operation across Pakistan and  around the world – the BBC has more correspondents in other countries than any other international broadcaster.

What have been the cutting-edge programmes Sairbeen has done so far? 

In the last year that Sairbeen was on air, we produced cutting-edge reports on Balochistan and on the persecution of minorities in Pakistan. These stories are very relevant to our audiences, but are not necessarily picked up or covered by the local media. When you look at the news landscape in Pakistan, it is this human element to the stories that often gets overlooked, and it is these human-interest stories that we want to bring to our audience.

Have you ever received any flak for a story? Not long ago, there was a certain political party that campaigned against the BBC and its coverage of its leader.

That is nothing new. Sometimes we are criticised by opposite sides of the story for being pro-other side. Perhaps, it’s because we don’t take sides at all but deliver a balanced coverage of the story by presenting the whole range of views.

You seem to have travelled and lived in different cities of the world. How has this shaped your perspective?

I was born and raised in Srinagar and grew up by the banks of the Dal lake surrounded by cousins, laughter and poetry. In many ways, it was an idyllic childhood. Till the time that it wasn’t. When I was around 12, we moved to the North Indian city of Ludhiana in Punjab where my dad was pursuing his doctorate. After that, I spent a few years in Jammu and then Delhi before moving to London.

Travel opens your eyes up to differences of culture, perspective and opinions. It also helps you understand that it’s these differences that make the human experience interesting and unique. I’d like to think I’m less judgmental, more open and more tolerant because of the way I was brought up.

Being Kashmiri, what do you think about the way the Kashmir dispute is reported in both India and Pakistan?

Kashmir is such a long-standing conflict between India and Pakistan that I think, when it comes to reporting (or not) of the issue, there’s a risk that news organisations run of internalising and reflecting deeply-entrenched national narratives on both sides. As a journalist, that is deeply problematic and the challenge is to look beyond this and get to the heart of the story. Impartiality lies at the heart of the BBC – we don’t focus on anyone’s view. We work to reflect the full range of interests and perspectives. And as journalists, we have to represent the whole spectrum of opinions – it is a requirement of BBC editorial guidelines.

Is it difficult to remain impartial?

People will tell you that absolute objectivity is impossible to achieve. Because, after all, journalists are human beings and have opinions which, consciously or subconsciously, inform their work. To an extent, this is true. However, any good journalist will tell you that their role is only to report on facts and let their audience make up their own minds. And for a good journalist, no matter how close you feel to the story, that is what we do.

International Youth Day: AGAHI Awards 2014 to have special categories on “Youth and Mental Health”.


With a median age of 22, 63% of youth is under the age of 29 years, making Pakistan as one of the youngest nations in the world – Puruesh Chaudhary, President Agahi

 

1 Islamabad, PK – 12 August 2014 – Youth is the most valuable asset for a country’s sustainable socio-economic, cultural and political development, AGAHI will create special categories in Youth Reporting at the upcoming AGAHI Awards 2014, this was announced today on the International Youth Day 2014.

 

The theme of International Youth Day 2014 is “Youth and Mental Health” under the slogan ‘Mental Health Matters’. 

 

“Youth had played an acknowledged role in the creation of Pakistan. The founder of Pakistan, Quaid-e-Azam, Muhammad Ali Jinnah had always reposed great trust in the young people as the agents of future prosperity of Pakistan. The youth continued to be vibrant and active and eager to play significant role in the progress and prosperity of the nation. With a median age of 22, 63% of youth in Pakistan is under the age of 29 years, making Pakistan as one of the youngest nations in the world. Youth in the country are brimming with ambition, enthusiasms, dynamism and commitment to rise, said Puruesh Chaudhary, President Agahi.

 

She further said “given the importance of Youth to Pakistan’s future development, it is necessary to provide means and environments in which this invaluable human resource attains the optimal growth potential, equipped with the requisite character strength and motivation to participate in the main stream of the practical life”. To highlight the importance of mental health for youth, the AGAHI Awards 2014 will have special categories on “Youth and Mental Health”, The Agahi Awards will be held in November 2014, with a call for submission to journalists in September this year, she further added.

 

Youth with mental health conditions can often experience stigma and discrimination, which in turn can lead to exclusion and/or discourage people from seeking help for fear of being negatively ‘labeled’. Efforts are needed to overcome this stigma to ensure that young people with mental health conditions can lead full and healthy lives free of isolation and unnecessary shame, and that they openly seek the services and support they need.

 

International Youth Day is observed all over the globe on August 12 every year. Young people face pressing global challenges, including high level of unemployment, vulnerable working conditions and marginalization from decision-making process. International Youth Day promotes national action and international support to improve the situation of young people. Every year, the UN works with governments, the private sector, civil society, academia and philanthropists to help increase opportunities for young people. The UN General Assembly proclaimed this day in its 1999 resolution A/RES/54/120.

 

The Agahi Awards are an annual series of journalism awards in Pakistan, developed under the umbrella of the Credibility Lab in collaboration with AGAHI Foundation and Mishal Pakistan, to encourage ethical and quality content. The evaluation methodology and criteria of the awards has been designed on the pillars of Media Development Indicators of UNESCO, with support from the Center for International Media Ethics (CIME) and UNESCO headquarters in Paris. Agahi Awards were inaugurated in March 2012 and have become the most prestigious annual awards for the journalism industry in Pakistan.

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62% girls are out of school in Balochistan


 

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58% govt schools in Baluchistan operate with only one teacher: ILM-O-AGAHI


Publication:  One Pakistan News
Date:  June 27, 2014
Web Address:
 http://pakistan.onepakistan.com.pk/news/city/quetta/312081-58-govt-schools-in-baluchistan-operate-with-only-one-teacher-ilm-o-agahi.html

QUETTA : The post 18th amendment devolution made education a provincial subject. Forcing provinces to take charge and be responsible to improve the state of education for their citizens. However, the capacity to deliver still lags behind as compared to the current situation and challenges.

?The need to restructure and build capacity of provincial education departments is at alarming situation. Baluchistan is the most neglected province on education, it continues to deteriorate not only in terms of physical infrastructure but also human capital as well?, this was the consensus at editors? round table meeting organized by ILM-O-AGAHI today. A number of senior journalists, bureau-chiefs and editors from leading national and regional newspapers, radio broadcasters and television channels participated in the roundtable.

The round table was organized by Mishal Pakistan in collaboration with Ilm Ideas. Earlier in the day a training workshop on education journalism was also organized and attended by more than 30 journalists reporting on education from various news organizations.

Addressing the participants, Mubashir Zaidi, senior journalist and the lead trainer for the education journalism workshop said, doing good journalism stories are crucial but both journalists and policy makers should start using data on education to improve the state of education in Baluchistan. Journalists identify community?s needs and can play a key role in setting the priorities of governments.

While sharing his views, ILM-o-AGAHI program manager, Asif Farooqui said, the Pakistani media lacks a framework to appreciate quality journalism on education, he further briefed that this year the AGAHI Awards will have special categories on education.

According to Alif Ailaan?s Pakistan District Education Rankings 2014, Baluchistan ranks lowest in education ranking among provinces and territories. There is an alarming situation of shortage of teachers in the province. 58% of the total government primary schools operate with only one teacher. The report also reveals that 62% girls between the ages 5-16 years are out of school in Baluchistan.

The objective of ILM-O-AGAHI initiative is to improve accountability and media coverage of priority education issues and build consensus on education policies by engaging various stakeholders, including media and policy makers.

Through the ILM-O-AGAHI initiative, 18 education journalism workshops have been held across Pakistan in the last two months. In each workshop, more than 30 education reporters participated in daylong sessions. These workshops were aimed to engage the journalists reporting on education. The journalists participated in these workshops through interactive sessions, role playing exercises and peer review of their news content development skills.

Mishal Pakistan is the partner institute of the Center for International Media Ethics and the Global Competitiveness and Benchmarking Networks of the World Economic Forum. Mishal assists the forum in creating soft-data on Pakistan, identifying Pakistan?s competitiveness challenges including primary health & education and higher education.

Call to restructure Provincial Education Department


Publication: Daily Baluchistan Express
Date:  June 27, 2014
Web Addres:
 http://www.balochistanexpressquetta.com/2014/06/26/call-to-restructure-provincial-education-department/

 

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QUETTA: Speakers at seminar on the current status of education in Balochistan said that the post 18th amendment devolution made education a provincial subject, forcing provinces to take charge and be responsible to improve the state of education for their populace.

“However, the capacity to deliver still lags behind as compared to the current situation and challenges,” this was the consensus at editors’ and reporters during a round table meeting organized by ILM-O-AGAHI here in the provincial capital on Thursday.

“The need to restructure and build capacity of provincial Education Departments is badly felt. Baluchistan is the most neglected province in terms of education and the situation still further continues to deteriorate not only in terms of physical infrastructure but also in human capital as well”, said the speakers during the discussion which was attended by a number of senior journalists, bureau-chiefs and editors from leading national and regional newspapers, radio broadcasters and television channels also participated in the roundtable.

The round table was organized by Mishal Pakistan in collaboration with Ilm Ideas. Earlier in the day a training workshop on education journalism was also organized and attended by more than 30 journalists reporting on education from various news organizations.

Addressing the participants, Mubashir Zaidi, senior journalist and the lead trainer for the education journalism workshop said that quality stories are crucial in journalism but both journalists and policy makers should start using data on education to improve the state of education in Baluchistan. “Journalists identify community’s needs and can play a key role in setting the priorities of governments,” he added.

While sharing his views, ILM-o-AGAHI program manager, Asif Farooqui said the Pakistani media lacks a framework to appreciate quality journalism on education, adding that that this year the AGAHI Awards will have special categories on education.

“According to Alif Ailaan’s Pakistan District Education Rankings 2014, Baluchistan ranks lowest in education ranking among provinces and territories. There is an alarming situation of shortage of teachers in the province. 58% of the total government primary schools operate with only one teacher. The report also reveals that 62% girls between the ages 5-16 years are out of school in Baluchistan,” he said.

He said that the objective of ILM-O-AGAHI initiative is to improve accountability and media coverage of priority education issues and build consensus on education policies by engaging various stakeholders, including media and policy makers.

“Through the ILM-O-AGAHI initiative, 18 education journalism workshops have been held across Pakistan in the last two months. In each workshop, more than 30 education reporters participated in daylong sessions. These workshops were aimed to engage the journalists reporting on education. The journalists participated in these workshops through interactive sessions, role playing exercises and peer review of their news content development skills,” he said.

Underlining the objectives of Mishal, Asif Farooqui said that Mishal Pakistan is the partner institute of the Center for International Media Ethics and the Global Competitiveness and Benchmarking Networks of the World Economic Forum. Mishal assists the forum in creating soft-data on Pakistan, identifying Pakistan’s competitiveness challenges including primary health & education and higher education.

62% girls in Baluchistan are out of School


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58% government schools in Baluchistan operate with only one teacher: ILM-O-AGAHI

Quetta, PK – 26 June 2014 –“The post 18th amendment devolution made education a provincial subject. Forcing provinces to take charge and be responsible to improve the state of education for their citizens. However, the capacity to deliver still lags behind as compared to the current situation and challenges.

“The need to restructure and build capacity of provincial education departments is at alarming situation. Baluchistan is the most neglected province on education, it continues to deteriorate not only in terms of physical infrastructure but also human capital as well”, this was the consensus at editors’ round table meeting organized by ILM-O-AGAHI today. A number of senior journalists, bureau-chiefs and editors from leading national and regional newspapers, radio broadcasters and television channels participated in the roundtable.

The round table was organized by Mishal Pakistan in collaboration with Ilm Ideas. Earlier in the day a training workshop on education 10440700_843331185678980_5275780005322840387_njournalism was also organized and attended by more than 30 journalists reporting on education from various news organizations.

Addressing the participants, Mubashir Zaidi, senior journalist and the lead trainer for the education journalism workshop said, doing good journalism stories are crucial but both journalists and policy makers should start using data on education to improve the state of education in Baluchistan. Journalists identify community’s needs and can play a key role in setting the priorities of governments.

While sharing his views, ILM-o-AGAHI program manager, Asif Farooqui said, the Pakistani media lacks a framework to appreciate quality journalism on education, he further briefed that this year the AGAHI Awards will have special categories on education.

According to Alif Ailaan’s Pakistan District Education Rankings 2014, Baluchistan ranks lowest in education ranking among provinces and territories. There is an alarming situation of shortage of teachers in the province. 58% of the total government primary schools operate with only one teacher. The report also reveals that 62% girls between the ages 5-16 years are out of school in Baluchistan.

The objective of ILM-O-AGAHI initiative is to improve accountability and media coverage of priority education issues and build consensus on education policies by engaging various stakeholders, including media and policy makers.

Through the ILM-O-AGAHI initiative, 18 education journalism workshops have been held across Pakistan in the last two months. In each workshop, more than 30 education reporters participated in daylong sessions. These workshops were aimed to engage the journalists reporting on education. The journalists participated in these workshops through interactive sessions, role playing exercises and peer review of their news content development skills.

Mishal Pakistan is the partner institute of the Center for International Media Ethics and the Global Competitiveness and Benchmarking Networks of the World Economic Forum. Mishal assists the forum in creating soft-data on Pakistan, identifying Pakistan’s competitiveness challenges including primary health & education and higher education.

For press release in Urdu Click Here
For more information please visit: www.ilmoagahi.org

“Government should allocate 4% of GDP for Education”


News:

Publication: Daily Jehan Pakistan
Date: June 24, 2014
weblinks; http://www.jehanpakistan.com/epaper/detail_news.php?news=%2Fepaper%2Fepaper%2Flahore%2F240614%2FP14-02.jpg#sthash.dIN8j7j9.dpbs1

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“Political will is needed to strengthen the education system in Pakistan” Puruesh Chaudhary


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