The Art of Communication

Institute of Communication Studies, University of Punjab Collaborates with Mishal Pakistan to Develop Media Credibility Index

Posted by on 18 Jul, 2013

Institute of Communication Studies (ICS), University of Punjab Collaborates with Mishal Pakistan to develop Media Credibility Index, an initiative to create new frameworks and methodologies to measure current trends and indices on media ethics, journalism standards, media credibility and rankings to be measured on international benchmarks.

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Posted by on 19 Apr, 2014

Publication:  National Herald Tribune Date:  April 17, 2014 Web Address:...

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PreCall – 4th intl. conference on M4D – Dakar, Senegal – 8-9 April 2014

Posted by on 19 Mar, 2013

This conference is the fourth in the M4D biennial series following the inaugural conference in Karlstad, Sweden in 2008. The 2nd conference was in Kampala, Uganda in 2010 and the...

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Posted by on 17 Apr, 2014

Islamabad, PK – 16 April, 2014 - Islamabad: Challenging the current ways through which the state is addressing the education emergency in the country, DisruptEd – ideas and...

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Publication:  National Herald Tribune
Date:  April 17, 2014
Web Address:
http://dailynht.com/epaper/main.php?action=epaper&id=main&page=7&dt=17-04-2014

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Potential: ‘Better coordination needed to promote local business’


Publication:  The Express Tribune    
Date:  April 16, 2014
Web Address: http://tribune.com.pk/story/696572/potential-better-coordination-needed-to-promote-local-business/

There is a need for promoting medium enterprises in the private sector which require only $1 million to $15 million besides energy and venture capital. DESIGN: JAHANZAIB HAQUE

ISLAMABAD: 

Pakistan has immense potential in certain sectors like agribusiness, dairy, Fast Moving Consumers Goods (FMCGs) and Information and communicationtechnology (ICT), said Sadika Hameed, a US expert, during an interview.

There is a need for promoting medium enterprises in the private sector which require only $1 million to $15 million besides energy and venture capital. Hameed, currently visiting Pakistan, is a renowned economist and a fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies(CSIS) a leading US think tank based out of Washington DC.

“Better coordination between the US embassy and local companies can help target US development work toward specific undertakings that will promote local business growth,” she said. Pakistan has also great potential for US investors to help bring in cheaper but quality education and health facilities. APP

Pakistan has immense potential for investment


Business Recorder
Date:  April 16, 2014
Web Address:   http://www.brecorder.com/top-news/108-pakistan-top-news/167572-pakistan-has-immense-potential-for-investment.html

ISLAMABAD: Pakistan has immense potential in certain sectors like agribusiness, dairy, Fast Moving Consumers Goods (FMCGs) andInformation and communicationtechnology (ICT), Sadika Hameed a US expert has said here in an interview.

There is a need for promoting medium enterprises in private sector which requires only US $ 1 million to $ 15 million besides energy and venture capital.

Sadika Hameed, currently visiting Pakistan is renowned economists and fellow of the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) a leading US think tank based out of Washington DC.

“Better coordination between the US embassy and local companies can help target US development work toward specific undertakings that will promote local business growth“, she said.

Pakistan has also great potential for US investors to help bring in cheaper but quality education and health facilities in Pakistan.

She held three roundtables at Karachi, Lahore, Peshawar and the latest in Islamabad on Private sector

development in Pakistan at the invitation of MISHAL Pakistan a partner institute of the Center for International Media and Global Competitiveness and benchmarking network of World Economic Forum (WEF).

MISHAL is also assists the forum in creating soft-data on Pakistan, identifying Pakistan’s Competitiveness challenges and opportunities for public private, civil society and academia to collaborate for sustained economic growth.

She said that private sector in Pakistan are keen on exploring partnership with US companies and enhanced private sector to private sector business cooperation between US and Pakistan can be mutually beneficial besides helping Pakistan to move towards a stable and strong self sustaining economy.

She stressed the need to address international business and media perceptions about the general economic and social environment in Pakistan with special emphasis to highlight the potential consumers to the tune of 180 million and rapidly growing private sector. The strategic geographic location and availability of the most favourable demographic age distributions in the world.

“Investment in Pakistan presents a confluence of interest for both US businesses and the people of Pakistan. Pakistan’s economy has a number of structural factors that will translate investment into growth”, she remarked.

The first of these factors is the age distribution of Pakistan’s population that private sector led development approach can turn the youth bulge from a liability to an asset, paying out a “demographic dividend” as young workers accumulate wealth without a large retired population to support, she argued.

“With 56 percent of Pakistan’s population under 21, Pakistan is poised to see millions of youth enter their productive twenties and thirties. Expanding business can employ this population, reaping the rewards of inexpensive, productive, and skilled labour”, she remarked.

 

 

 

DisruptED the Way Forward for a Prosperous Pakistan


Islamabad, PK – 16 April, 2014 - Islamabad: Challenging the current ways through which the state is addressing the education emergency in the country, DisruptEd – ideas and conversations for disruptive innovation in Pakistan, organised by Alif Ailaan outlined the need for new approaches to fix the broken system. Despite 25 million children being out of school, the country has not been successful in marshaling its resources for reform or change, nor does the state or society or the polity treat education like the crisis or emergency that we claim it is.

Speaking at the closing session, Ahasan Iqbal, Minister for Planning, Government of Pakistan at the DisruptEd in Islamabad today said, ours is a society characters by great disparities in income, education and opportunity. Nearly half of our country’s children are not in schools and getting them there is a herculean challenge. He further said, the role of technology and innovation in such a scenario is imperative to the way we deliver education not only to children but also to the society as a whole.

25 million children in Pakistan remains out of school across Pakistan, of those 25 million, about six million have never, ever seen the inside of a classroom. The rest have enrolled at one point or another, only to drop out, most likely within the first three years of enrolling at the age of five. An out of school Pakistani child is more likely to be a girl than an enrolled Pakistani child, with over 15 million of the 25 million out of school kids being girls.

On the quality of education, the government data doesn’t capture quality, at any level, in any province. Our entire conception of education quality is based on the Annual Status of Education Report survey (ASER), a civil society initiative. ASER tells us that of the kids in school, only 50% at the Class 5 level can read a Class 2 level passage in Urdu or their native language (for rural Pakistan, this number increases to 55% for urban Pakistan).

Based on the theme of disruptive innovation in education, the event highlighted that new avenues to deal with education problem must be explored and implemented to change how the crisis is perceived and addressed by the state and other stakeholders.

The one-day DisruptEd – Ideas and Conversations for Innovation in Education, a daylong multi-sessions initiative brought together leading thinkers, policy makers, civil society concerns and media professionals to discuss and debate the potential of innovation in the education sector.

Mosharaf Zaidi, Director Campaign of Alif Ailaan in his speech said, “without a ‘disruption’ to the way things are, a fundamental change that alters the very basics, there is little chance of Pakistan being able to deal with the Education crisis. None of the major problems in education low enrolment rates, poor quality, lack of accountability and the total absence of a robust discourse can be solved without bold new approach.” We need to stimulate thinking in the public, private and non-profit sectors about solutions to these problems, he added.

Pakistan faces a national education emergency but stories related to education rarely make it to the front page of newspapers or appear in prime-time slots on television. Alif Ailaan’s mission is to put the subject of education at the front and centre of public discourse in Pakistan.

The Oscar award-winning director, Sharmeen Obaid Chinoy in her session highlighted the art of story telling on innovation and Disrupted education, she said immersed in an information-driven culture, innovators too must learn to tell a compelling story.

There are many who claim that Internet bandwidth and capacity are barriers to the use of technology for improving access to education and enriching the learning experience. Others insist that content is king and that educational materials must be developed before or along with the bandwidth to deliver it. But content developers have failed so far to fully exploit the potential of 2G technology. Technology innovation can be the catalyst for change and the disruptive factor for improving the service delivery on education.

Mr. Asad Umar, Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf’s member of the national assembly of Pakistan while talking on public private partnership said that there are serious issues in terms of capacity of state and misplaced priorities of governments. One schooling system policy should be adopted to remove discriminations in education systems.

Marvi Memon, MNA of Pakistan Muslim League (N) shared her views with participants about the status of education at the grass-root level in in Sindh, she said. “Education is our prime objective, however there are a lot other issues like syllabus, teachers capacity, ghost schools and political interference, which needs to be addresses by making legislators accountable to the peoples.

Associate Professor of Lahore University of Management Sciences, Dr. Faisal Bari shared his views about the regulatory framework, he said we have made frameworks and regulations on education but the core issue remains financing free and compulsory education by the state. He said the state and society are not thinking, where we can have money to ensure quality of education.

Kasim Kasuri, Young Global Leader of World Economic Forum and CEO of Beacon House School Systems said that there are many challenges and hurdles for private sector to work in the education sector and no meaningful recommendations have been incorporated while preparing any laws to govern this sector.

A general consensus from various sessions was gathered on the need for a universal education system in the country, where the private sector can bring in the efficiencies through innovation in management, the public sector with its infrastructure and the civil society organization with their civic engagements can improve the current state of education in the country. However the critical factor remains the need for legislators to allocate more attention to education in terms of both governance and allocation of funds.

Alif Ailaan was founded to bring together and empower all those Pakistanis who want to respond to the country’s education emergency, and equip our children to succeed for themselves and for Pakistan.

Education journalism: Why education is neglected in the media


Publication: PKAFFARIS.COM
Date:  April 2, 2014
Web Address
; http://www.affairs.com.pk/News_Education-journalism-Why-education-is-neglected-in-the-media_44259

Education is one of the most neglected sectors in media, as journalists often consider it boring to report on the subject”, said former education minister Mian Imran Masood at a journalism workshop on Tuesday.
The Ilm-o-Agahi one-day workshop was organized by an NGO and a partner institute of the Centre for International Media Ethics and the Global Competitiveness and Benchmarking Networks of the World Economic Forum, in collaboration with Ilm Ideas (a three year UK-Aid funded programme). It was a part of an 18-journalism-workshop-series that will be held across Pakistan for education reporters.
Masood said that a lack of authentic information and competing interest of stake holders made it difficult for reporters to follow up on education related policies and issues. He said this also effected investigation of budget allocations.
“Ilm-o-Agahi’s objective is to encourage journalists to create narratives that enable equal access to education,” Programme Manager Asif Farooqui said. He said they hoped to analyse policy reforms in the education sector to ensure that it is strengthened.
There are also plans to introduce special categories for education journalism in the upcoming annual journalism Agahi Awards 2014.
Journalist Mubashir Zaidi said the media should play an active role in promoting education for marginalized segments of society. He said this would help eliminate economic disparity. He added that the media needed to sensitise people about the need for quality education through reporting and highlighting various issues in the sector.
Saad Hamid, a social media expert, said journalism had seen a paradigm shift with the advent of social media. He said this was especially significant for citizen journalism, where ordinary people could be involved in spreading news through social media forums. He said social media had extended the reach of a journalist globally.
He also stressed its role in ‘digital storytelling’. “Gathering news, verifying and publishing has seen a revolutionary change. Social media has taken transparency to higher levels,” he claimed.
Huma Zia, a research and policy analyst at Idara-e-Taleem-o-Agahi, discussed the Annual Status of Education Report’s findings with journalists during the session. She said according to report 16 per cent of children between the ages of five and 16 had no access to school.
She added that 34 per cent of children enrolled in Class 5 could not read a Class 2 story in Urdu, and 38 per cent of Class 5 children could not read English stories. She said that for sustainable growth, the government needed to shift its focus from ‘access’ to access and learning

Speakers urge media to lay emphasis on education sector


Publication: Daily Business Recorder
Date:  April 2, 2014
Web Address
; http://www.brecorder.com/general-news/172/1168714/

“Pakistan today needs more emphasis on education sector and media should also follow suit. Education sector is one of the most neglecting areas in reporting in media. Journalists often find it boring to report or securitize the education sector. Lack of stakeholder’s interest and commitment to the education sector makes it different for reporters to do follow up on education policy or scrutinise education budget allocation. This was stated by Ex. Minister for Education, Punjab, Mian Imran Masood, at the ILM-o-AGAHI education journalism workshop held in Lahore, today.

The ILM-o-AGAHI, one day workshop was organised by Mishal Pakistan in collaboration with Ilm Ideas (3 year UK aid funded program). More than thirty education reporters from all leading media entities, from print, television, radio and online journalism, were selected for the workshop.

Award winning senior journalist, Mubashir Zaidi said that Pakistan’s media should play an active role inpromoting education for the marginalized segments of the society as it can help to eliminate economic disparity through the introduction of quality education. “New entrants in the field of journalism should therefore strive to sensitise the people on the importance of education, as education is the key to success for progress” he added.

Asif Farooqui, Program Manager, ILM-o-AGAHI, while discussing the salient features of the initiative said that a learning platform for journalists on education would be developed as a ready reference for journalists working on education related issues. “The objective of ILM-o-AGAHI initiative is to encourage journalists to create narratives which enable equal access to education for all while analysing the policy reforms within the education sector and aimed to strengthen institutions” he added.

He further said “Mishal is also introducing special categories on education journalism in the upcoming annual journalism “AGAHI Awards 2014″ to promote education journalism in Pakistan.”

Saad Hamid, social media expert, spoke on the art of story-telling through social media. He said in the age of social media, journalism has seen a paradigm shift with the advent of citizen journalism where everyone is in some way involved in spreading news around. Social Media has broken all social and cultural barriers and has extended the reach of a journalist globally. The role of social media in digital storytelling is crucial. Finding a news, verifying it and publishing has seen a revolutionary change and has helped take transparency to better levels.
Huma Zia, Research and Policy Analyst, Idara-e-Taleem-o-Agahi, discussed Annual Status of Education Report’s findings on education with the Journalists during the session. She said according to the Annual Status of Education Report – ASER 2013 National Survey that 16 % children have no access to school between the ages of 5-16 years.

Annual Status of Education Report (ASER) is a household based citizen led large scale assessment seeking evidence on learning and access. According to the Punjab findings 34 % children enrolled in class 5 cannot read a class 2 story in Urdu, 38% class 5 children cannot read English stories and 44% cannot do 2 digit division. “The government needs to shift its focus from ‘access’ to ‘access plus learning’ for sustainable growth” she added.

Through the ILM-o-AGAHI initiative, 18 education journalism workshops will be held across Pakistan for education reporters to increase their capacity and improve the coverage on education issues in media. In each workshop, more than 30 education reporters will be selected to enhance their capacity to report on identified educational challenges and issues to improve understanding and skills among journalists to capture community’s perspective and voice including children’s voice.

Education journalism: Why education is neglected in the media


Publication: Pakistan Times
Date:  April 2, 2014
Web Address:
http://pktimes.4com.co/2014/04/02/education-journalism-why-education-is-neglected-in-the-media/

LAHORE:
“Education is one of the most neglected sectors in media, as journalists often consider it boring to report on the subject”, said former education minister Mian Imran Masood at a journalism workshop on Tuesday.

The Ilm-o-Agahi one-day workshop was organized by an NGO and a partner institute of the Centre for International Media Ethics and the Global Competitiveness and Benchmarking Networks of the World Economic Forum, in collaboration with Ilm Ideas (a three year UK-Aid funded programme). It was a part of an 18-journalism-workshop-series that will be held across Pakistan for education reporters.

Masood said that a lack of authentic information and competing interest of stake holders made it difficult for reporters to follow up on education related policies and issues. He said this also effected investigation of budget allocations.

“Ilm-o-Agahi’s objective is to encourage journalists to create narratives that enable equal access to education,” Programme Manager Asif Farooqui said.  He said they hoped to analyse policy reforms in the education sector to ensure that it is strengthened.

There are also plans to introduce special categories for education journalism in the upcoming annual journalism Agahi Awards 2014.

Journalist Mubashir Zaidi said the media should play an active role in promoting education for marginalized segments of society. He said this would help eliminate economic disparity. He added that the media needed to sensitise people about the need for quality education through reporting and highlighting various issues in the sector.

Saad Hamid, a social media expert, said journalism had seen a paradigm shift with the advent of social media. He said this was especially significant for citizen journalism, where ordinary people could be involved in spreading news through social media forums. He said social media had extended the reach of a journalist globally.

He also stressed its role in ‘digital storytelling’. “Gathering news, verifying and publishing has seen a revolutionary change. Social media has taken transparency to higher levels,” he claimed.

Huma Zia, a research and policy analyst at Idara-e-Taleem-o-Agahi, discussed the Annual Status of Education Report’s findings with journalists during the session. She said according to report 16 per cent of children between the ages of five and 16 had no access to school.

She added that 34 per cent of children enrolled in Class 5 could not read a Class 2 story in Urdu, and 38 per cent of Class 5 children could not read English stories. She said that for sustainable growth, the government needed to shift its focus from ‘access’ to access and learning.

Published in The Express Tribune, April 2nd, 2014.

Education journalism: Why education is neglected in the media


AHORE: 

“Education is one of the most neglected sectors in media, as journalists often consider it boring to report on the subject”, said former education minister Mian Imran Masood at a journalism workshop on Tuesday.

Publication: The Express Tribune
Date:  April 2, 2014
Web Address:
http://tribune.com.pk/story/690170/education-journalism-why-education-is-neglected-in-the-media/

The Ilm-o-Agahi one-day workshop was organized by an NGO and a partner institute of the Centre for International Media Ethics and the Global Competitiveness and Benchmarking Networks of the World Economic Forum, in collaboration with Ilm Ideas (a three year UK-Aid funded programme). It was a part of an 18-journalism-workshop-series that will be held across Pakistan for education reporters.